Timothy Taylor Gallery

These are photos taken always from the inside of rented cars. They explore two of the pillars of American culture: the car and the road. Perhaps the best way to experience the physical territory and the sentimental map of the EE UU: from an automobile and roads as trails. NYC Mayor is likely to agree. Cars and roads are two American pillars of culture and way of life. Continue to learn more with: NY Museums .

Lee Friedlander (Aberdeen, Washington, 1934) bonded both items, vehicles and asphalt, and devoted himself to wander through their country in rented cars for years. I wanted to portray the country from the windshield of the car, from the inside of one the most attached to the Yankee idiosyncrasies of consumer goods. The series of photos, America by Car (America by car), which is exposed at the Timothy Taylor Gallery in London, is the result of the drift of the Grandmaster, one of the pillars the photographic currents of the new documentary and social landscape. From the taken driver’s seat ever since the seat of the driver and the usual square format in the recent work of Friedlander, 192 images of the series make use of mirrors, the moons and the side Windows as frames for photos. Point of view is a man who travels the country and observes it without abandoning the rolling space of a car. The result combines the vision documentary with a composition that occasionally reminiscent of Cubist painting and its powerful lines of flight. The exhibition is completed with another series, The New Cars (new cars), who commissioned him to Friedlander Harper s Bazaar magazine in 1964 to present to readers the latest models from the manufacturers, Chrysler, Buick, Pontiac and Cadillac.

Instead of photographing cars with glamorous style to use, Frielander took out them of context and portrayed them in actual sets: a drive-in, the parking lot of a House for sale, the reflection in the window of a furniture store Photos of cars, with high level of contrast, not conventional and silhouetted perspectives, acquire an almost ghostly presence. That was too bold for the magazine, which decided to pay the photographer their fees but not to publish the story. Friedlander takes pictures from the age of 14. His work gained notoriety when he was selected, along with Garry Winogrand and Diane Arbus, to participate in the New Document in the MoMa of New York exhibition. Source of the news: the United States seen through the windscreen of a car.

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